Blizzards for Days

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She’s twisting Blizzards and serving up sweet treats. Even though senior Katelyn Misinonile considers herself a “regular ole’ Joe”, she is working almost full time while still in high school. When she’s not in school and not at work, she’s taking college classes.

“Well, it’s not full time– legally. I work about 35 hours a week because a minor can’t work full time,” Misinonile said.

Misinonile works at Dairy Queen in the 40-42 area. She’s worked there for about a year and has gained experience and the hours that come with.

“I became somewhat full time whenever our summer hours started. Since then (around February), I’ve worked six days a week, roughly about six hour shifts every time,” Misinonile said.

For the senior, this is a bit more strenuous than other teenagers’ schedules.

“It’s hard to balance, especially with a social life and family time. I feel like one or the other suffers the most because of how busy I am,” said Misinonile. “It’s very annoying when you see all your friends hanging out and they’re having fun without you because you have to work.”

While working so many hours a week, Misinonile feels like she has little time to have a vacation.

“I’ve missed out on a lot of beach trips with my friends, going to the mall or just family events most of the time. It’s really hard trying to get work off for a certain day whenever it’s last minute,” Misinonile said.

In spite of the challenges Misinonile faces, she does not regret devoting herself to a job.

“I definitely think it’s rewarding because I don’t know many people who already had their own car paid off all by themselves,” Misinonile said. “It feels good making my own money because I can buy clothes, or just things that I personally want without having to feel bad for asking my mom for money.”

She looks forward to receiving her paychecks, but not because of the dollar sign.

“It means that I can do something for myself and treat myself for working so hard.  I also save a lot of my money, and I have about $6,000 saved up from when I began working my sophomore year,” Misinonile said.